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What the chancellor’s summer statement will mean for you and your family

Everything you need to know…

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Bill Boaden / Geograph

Rishi Sunak has announced today the economic schemes for post-coronavirus, and they include some pretty big changes.

Mr Sunak announced a £2bn kickstart scheme designed to create jobs, incentives for businesses to bring people off furlough, VAT cuts, a stamp duty holiday plus more.

Details of how this package will be paid for – by tax increases and borrowing – are expected to be unveiled in the chancellor’s Autumn budget.

Here’s a breakdown of his main points:

Furlough

Members of the public who have been placed on furlough as part of the government’s Job Retention Scheme are aware that this is coming to end in October, but many people have been concerned for the future of their jobs.

Mr Sunak today announced an incentive for businesses to bring back those employees that are on furlough, with a £1,000 bonus for every person they bring back into the workplace.

He said: “So for businesses to get the bonus, the employee must be paid at least £520 on average, in each month from November to the end of January – the equivalent of the lower earnings limit in National Insurance.”

Employment

The chancellor has also announced a £2 billion kickstart scheme that will pay employers to create jobs for people aged between 18 and 24. The government emphasised that they need to be ‘good jobs’, and the government will pay six months of wages plus an amount to cover overheads. The grant for a 24-year-old will be around £6,500. 

There will also be a new £2,000 payment to firms who take on apprentices. This is alongside an unspecified amount of funding for career advisors.

On top of that, there’ll be traineeships to get young people ready for work, including work experience placements and work preparation for 16-24-year olds. 

Tourism & Hospitality

The chancellor has cut VAT for the tourism and hospitality sectors on food, accommodation and attractions from the usual 20% to 5%, which will come into effect from next Wednesday and last until January 2021.

Mr Sunak has also announced that everyone in the country will be given 50% off meal and drinks for the whole of August through a ‘Eat Out to Help Out’ scheme.

This scheme sees a 50% reduction up to a value of £10 per head on sit down meals and non-alcoholic drinks Monday to Wednesday.

The chancellor hopes this will get 1.8 million people who work in the hospitality industry back in jobs and ‘customers back in restaurants, cafes and pubs’.

Businesses can claim the money back from the government and the funds will appear in their bank account within five working days.

More details on the Eat Out to Help Out scheme are yet to be confirmed.

It is currently being debated as to whether the reduced VAT will be passed onto the consumer in lower prices as many in the sector will consider this as an opportunity to shore up their finances and ail their business.

Buying a Home

If you’re in the market for house-buying, the chancellor announced a stamp duty holiday which could save you thousands.

The rate at which stamp duty will be placed on a home has been increased from the usual £125,000 to £500,000 in England and Northern Ireland, with immediate effect until March 31st.

The stamp duty holiday hopes to get people buying houses again, a sector which suffered a big drought throughout coronavirus.

The chancellor explained that on average people buying a home could save £4,500, and current homeowners moving on could see savings as big as £14,999.

Many people have expressed concerns regarding how this will help first-time buyers. Around 16% of housing sales in England are not liable for stamp duty as is the case with first-time buyers.

Currently, first-time buyers only pay a 5% stamp duty on houses between £300,000 and £500,000 which means this scheme will not affect new buyers directly.

Those buying a new home or second home will reap the benefits of this scheme.

Green Home Grant

Mr Sunak has announced a budget for home improvements that will help your home become ‘greener’, for instance, double glazing, eco-friendly boilers, low-energy lighting, energy-efficient doors and loft, floor or wall insulation.

The scheme will start in September and will see the government pay for at least two-thirds of the cost of home improvements that save energy, up to a value of £5,000.

Low-income households are expected to receive a larger contribution of up to £10,000.

This is expected to create new jobs and enable the UK to achieve its 2050 goal of net-zero carbon emissions. More information can be found here.

Feature

ABANDONED MANCHESTER: Exploring the city’s derelict buildings

Manchester has countless abandoned and derelict buildings waiting to be explored…

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The Derelict Explorer / Facebook

While Manchester is one of the most up-and-coming cities in the UK at the moment, a vast proportion of its industrial past continue to stand derelict to this very day.

And, luckily for those of us who don’t fancy stepping foot into a crumbling building housing many ghosts, there’s one man exploring all of Manchester’s abandoned gems for us.

Matthew Holmes, known as The Derelict Explorer on social media, has explored every old and eerie building Manchester has to offer, wether it be the sinister looking Odeon on your walk home or a crumbling old cottage out of the city.

Let’s take a look at some of the highlights from his page…

The Derelict Explorer / Facebook

The Derelict Explorer / Facebook

The Smith’s Arms Pub, Ancoats

A true Ancoats staple, The Smith’s Arms pub opened all the way back in 1827 and is now one of the last of the ‘slums’ left in the area, where poor factory workers lived on top of each other in rows and rows of terraced houses.

As a result of decline in the surrounding factories and mills, the number of workers using the mill dropped after the 1960’s, something that had a massive impact on the pub. Sadly, in 1990, it was forced to close it’s doors for good.

Remarkably, the building still contains a number of original features, including a narrow Georgian staircase still located in the middle of the building, the original entrance door from 1775 and the tiled entrance flooring, which is arguably the best part of the building.

The Derelict Explorer / Facebook

The Derelict Explorer / Facebook

Old Adelphi Building, Salford

The Old Adelphi Building opened in 1915 as a chemical factory built for Griffiths Hughes, a company who made products such as Rennies (saviour), Radox, Kruschen Salts and Trugel.

The building was eventually bought by the Salford Royal College of Advanced Technology and, in the late 1980’s, was eventually renamed to Adelphi Campus and became the School of Media, Music and Performance.

The building closed in 2016 but, today, it remains derelict and still contains remenants from its time as a college, complete with tables, chairs, music equipment and even old dissertation feedback forms.

The Derelict Explorer / Facebook

The Derelict Explorer / Facebook

Chorlton Swimming Baths, Chorlton

The Chorlton Swimming Baths opened its doors in 1920 with separate male and female pools in a time when people were separated by their class and gender.

The building also housed a wash room so the local residents could wash their clothes. Later this became the sports hall up until the buildings closure.

However, the arrival of the new leisure centre complex in Chorlton caused the original Chorlton Swimming Baths to permanently close in 2015. Today, the original swimming pool is still present, as are the retro changing rooms lined along the side and squash and basketball courts.

The Derelict Explorer / Facebook

The Derelict Explorer / Facebook

‘The Toast Rack Building’, Fallowfield

Opening back in 1960, The Toast Rack Building – or the Hollins Campus, as it later became renamed – was the first building of its kind entering a new age of architecture, with modern concrete towers beginning to grow across Manchester after the Second World War.

(The Grade II Listed building gained its name due to, you guessed it, its distinctive design which looks very much like a Toast Rack.)

The building closed for good following a re-shuffle of MMU’s departments and faculties in 2013 and has stood abandoned ever since, its old lecture theatres and classrooms falling victim to vandalism and graffiti.

The Derelict Explorer / Facebook

The Derelict Explorer / Facebook

Stevenson Square Underground Toilets

When you’re next sipping a cocktail or a £6 pint of craft beer in Stevenson Square, just remember that an abandoned public toilet lurks beneath your feet.

All twelve cubicles separated between the male and female toilets are somehow intact (though I doubt they’ll work very well) and have never been refurbished, so have the same tiles and flooring from when they would’ve been in use all those years ago.

Due to high maintenance, the toilets served the public until 1986 when they closed and the entrances were bricked up.

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Feature

The chilling tale of the Swedish twins who ran into traffic on M6 before stabbing a man to death

The twins were believed to have been experiencing a ‘shared psychosis’ at the time of the incidents

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On Saturday May 17th 2008, Highway Agency officers were called out to the M6 after two women were spotted spotted walking along the median of the motorway on a security camera.

But little did these officers know, their day at work would be far from an ordinary one and would in fact turn into of the most infamous and most highly publicised traffic incidents of its decade.

It all started in Liverpool; Sabina and Ursula Eriksson, two Swedish women in their late-thirties at the time, had traveled to the city by ferry from Sabina’s home in County Cork, Ireland.

Ursula was visiting her sister from her home in the US and, upon arriving in Liverpool, went to visit St. Anne Police Station with Sabina, who reported concerns about the safety of her children back in Ireland.

BBC

However, it is believed that from there, the twins went on to board a National Express Coach to London, where the driver grew suspicious of their behaviour and eventually ordered them off the vehicle at Keele service station.

After the twins behaved erratically with their luggage, the service manager called the police out of concern that the twins were carrying explosives. When the police came to speak to the women, however, they allowed them to leave.

But what happened next was simply unprecedented; after leaving the service station on foot, sisters were spotted on security camera walking down the median of the M6. Shockingly, they were then seen trying to cross the busy road, were cars were traveling as fast as 70mph.

Highway Agency officers rushed to the scene, as did the Central Motorway Police Group who, little did the twins know, were being shadowed by film crews for BBC One’s Motorway Cops. 

BBC

Upon arrival, and with everything being caught on camera, the situation was apparently diffused, with the twins appearing calm while smoking cigarettes and chatting with officers. But, out of nowhere, Ursula suddenly darted out into the road, her green coat being pulled from her by a concerned officer as she ran forward.

A lorry traveling at an estimated 56mph hit Ursula and immediately crushed both her legs. At this, Sabina darted out and smashed straight into the windshield of a Volkswagen Polo, the force of which knocked her unconscious for fifteen minutes.

However, the drama was far from over.

When an air ambulance arrived, Sabina regained consciousness and began to immediately attack the police officer trying to help her, screaming “I recognise you, you’re not real” and making various claims of organ theft.

BBC

She then managed to get to her feet and, when asking why the police officers had tried to kill her, attempted to once again run into traffic. Luckily, officers were able to apprehend her and put her into handcuffs.

The sisters were eventually taken to the hospital where it was confirmed that Ursula had severely fractured both her legs. Sabina was remarkably uninjured, and was taken to the police station to be processed.

The following day, Sabina was released from court, where she pleaded guilty to the charges of punching a police officer and trespassing on the motorway, and was sentenced to one day in custody. But, having spent a full night in the police station, she was deemed to have served her sentence. Remarkably, there had been no full psychiatric evaluation.

Following her release, Sabina is said to have wandered the streets of Stoke-on-Trent in an attempt to find her sister. This is when where, at around 7pm, she was spotted by two men who were walking a dog, one of whom was fifty-four-year-old Glenn Hollinshead.

BBC

Taking pity on her, Glenn offered her a place to stay at his home – but the very next day while making dinner, Sabina stabbed him four times with a kitchen knife. 

According to reports, Sabina fled the scene armed with a hammer as Glenn’s neighbours contacted the police. As officers and paramedics pursued her, Sabina wound up on the top of a forty foot tall bridge, which she leapt from, breaking both her legs.

While she was recovering at University Hospital of North Staffordshire, police arrested her on June 6th 2008 and later charged with murder. Both sisters were relocated back to Sweden and then to the United States. Sabina went on to plead guilty to manslaughter with diminished responsibility.

Sabina’s defence argued that she was a secondary sufferer of Folie à deux, French for ‘a madness of two,’ or ‘shared psychosis’, going on to claim that she had transmitted insanity from her twin Ursula.

Bronzefield Women’s Prison

The prosecution at Nottingham Crown Court accepted this and, subsequently, Sabina received just five years, which were served at Bronzefield Women’s Prison.

Mr Justice Saunders described it as ‘one of the most difficult cases he had ever had to sentence’, saying: “While the mental illness resolved quickly, both psychiatrists agree it was serious and that she behaved in the way she did because of her illness.

“Her culpability for her behaviour is, on the medical evidence, accordingly low. She was suffering from delusions which she believed to be true and they dictated her behaviour. It is also not one of those cases where the defendant could have done something to avoid the onset.”

Since her release from prison in 2011, the whereabouts of Sabina Eriksson and her twin sister have remained unknown. 

You can watch the scene from BBC One’s Motorway Cops here. 

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Feature

The world record for a beer-chugging sprinting race was just broken in Manchester

We caught up with one of the Beer Mile World Classic’s Manc competitors..

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Laura Riches

The world record for a bizarre beer-chugging sprinting race was broken here in Manchester last month, and we’ve never wanted to down a pint and go for a sprint more in our lives.

Born as an underground frat tradition in San Francisco in 2015, The Beer Mile World Classics has evolved into an internationally renowned competition, with nearly 100,000 keen competitors from all over the world taking part and giving both their legs and their stomachs a run for their money each year.

The premise of the race is simple; competitors are tasked with running one mile but have to stop every quarter of a mile to drink a 355ml can or bottle of beer (not a pint, sadly) as quickly as they can before proceeding on with the race.

For anyone who’s jogged to catch the bus after one too many in the pub on a Friday night will know that the acts of running and drinking beer do not mix well, and all too frequently result in a lot of puke.

Laura Riches

Laura Riches

Of course, the organisers of the race have the possibility of throwing up covered; if any competitor pukes more than once during the race, they are forced to run a penalty lap at the end of the race. No rest for the wicked, obviously.

Over the years, the race has been held across a number of different locations, such as San Francisco, London, Vancouver, and Berlin – but this year, it was brought to Greater Manchester in the humble town of Leigh, where the world record was actually broken by Canadian runner Corey Bellemore, who completed the race in an impressive new world-record time of 4:28.1.

But why exactly was such a far-flung tradition brought to Leigh? Well, it is mainly down to Manc-born competitor Laura Riches, twenty-eight, who suggested her local running club Leigh Harriers and Athletic Club after hearing that the organisers were looking for a brand new location to bring the race to.

Speaking to Proper Manchester, Laura, from Tyldesley, explained that finding a track to accommodate the Beer Mile’s unique set of rules was quite the challenge, but the chairman of Leigh Harriers was ‘more than up for it’, noting: “Everybody in Leigh loves a good beer, so this is exactly what they’ll love.”

@laurariches / Instagram

Laura’s introduction into the world of the Beer Mile World Classics was a pure coincidence; while in London in 2016 for a party, she went to an event at the Allied Stadium to meet a friend, only to be roped into trying out for the England team by the organisers who were hosting their event there that year.

She said on her first time running: “It was hilarious because I’d never drank a beer in my life. It was awful, I hated every minute of it. But while my drinking was really slow, my running was quick enough for me to keep up with the other contestants. The first three laps I was catching everyone up but eventually my beer drinking slowed me down.”

Laura, who ended up competing for England in the Beer Mile World Classics in Vancouver in 2017, sadly couldn’t compete this year due to a knee injury, so instead helped to host and commentate the event. She said the race had a great turn out in Leigh, saying: “Surprisingly it was a good turn out – over a hundred people showed up.

“There was also loads of people from the running club and the nearby sporting village who came down after hearing about it too. It was mad, and it could have been even bigger if it had been held in the summer as originally planned.”

Laura Riches

Laura Riches

Laura also organised the ‘chunder mile’ for the locals and less experienced runners to take part in. She explained: “So I put on ‘the chunder mile’ which is where you drink actual pints and you’re allowed to be sick, and I did an open Beer Mile, and loads of people from Leigh actually came down and took part for a bit of fun.”

And it isn’t just the running, the medals and the abundance of beer that makes Laura go back each year; it’s the Beer Mile community.

She said: “We’re all part of a massive community now; I’ve made some great friends and we all have our own chats on Facebook and Whatsapp. There’s some great drinking videos that go around, and we’re always challenging each other to drink different things.

“It’s a bit of a weird and strange community, everyone has normal jobs and goes to work everyday and just run and train on the side. But it’s one thing we all share and enjoy together, even though it can be unpleasant; we’re all crazy to find the beer running fun.”

Head over to the Beer Mile World Classics website for more information on their upcoming events. 

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