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The truth behind claims NASA has discovered a parallel universe next to ours

The real story…

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A recent report from New Scientist states that ‘strange particles’ found in an experiment in Antarctica could be evidence of a reality ‘where everything is upside down’.

I took a deep dive to find out whether we really should believe everything we see on the internet. Short answer is no. 

The plausibility of the statement has been amplified for ‘sensational reasons’ according to particle physicist Peter Gorham from the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa.

What has essentially happened is a report has explained that scientists have concluded a rare event from very rare particles that defy our current understanding of physics.

We currently do not have the knowledge of parallel universes to determine definitively whether this new research is indeed a parallel universe.

There is also, according to Forbes, zero evidence to support the Daily Stars report of a ‘parallel universe, right next to ours, where all the rules of physics seem to be operating in reverse’.

Credit: Jeremy Thomas / Unsplash

Many articles have surfaced, mostly quoting each other, referring to a pay-walled post from New Scientist on April 8 that says ‘we may have spotted a parallel universe going backwards in time’ in its headline.

The article gathers a collection of information from three different scientific papers that essentially all point towards us needing to potentially consider alternative explanations behind the science.

So what is the experiment that has caused everyone to go cuckoo?

ANITA-IV. Credit: Drummermean / Wikipedia

This is where it gets really science-y. The original research paper from the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA), found ‘upward pointing cosmic ray-like-events’ from its balloon-based experiment.

ANITA is a stratospheric balloon-based experiment that has a radio antennae pointed back at Earth that detects radio waves emitted by very high-energy and very rare neutrinos as they strike an atom of ice.

These ‘new’ headlines are reporting on an experiment from 2016 whereby ANITA detected some signals that were best described as ‘anomalous’ that, according to New Scientist, ‘seemed impossible’.

The article went on to state: “Explaining this signal requires the existence of a topsy-turvy universe created in the same big bang as our own and existing in parallel with it. In this mirror world, positive is negative, left is right and time runs backwards.”

There were three main hypotheses for the detections: astrophysical explanation, systematic error or physics beyond the Standard Model.

IceCube. Credit: Amble / Wikipedia

Scientists at the IceCube Neutrino Observatory tried to search for the source of those signals, ruling out ANITA’s Standard Model explanation of the anomalous neutrino events in January 2020.

The IceCube Neutrino Observatory is in the South Pole and is made-up of 5,160 optical detectors buried in the ice that detect neutrinos passing through, reacting with hydrogen or oxygen atoms in the ice.

Essentially, Icecube and ANITA are detecting similar things, however IceCube is a remarkable tool to follow up ANITA. For each anomalous event ANITA detects, IceCube should detect many, many more.

In this instance, IceCube did not. The idea that these events recorded by ANITA came from some intense point source should be ruled out as the chances of ANITA seeing an event and IceCube not are very slim.

Credit: Jay Ruzesky / Unsplash

The paper concluded that: “An astrophysical explanation of these anomalous events under standard model assumptions is severely constrained regardless of source spectrum.”

This translates to us lot who are definitely not physicists as: ‘we don’t know where these signals come from’. It does not translate to: ‘they come from a parallel universe’.

A mathematician has explained the science behind this experiment in a nicely condensed Twitter thread that you can read here.

The reports of a parallel universe comes from a paper that reads: “In this scenario, the universe before the Big Bang and the universe after the Big Bang is reinterpreted as a universe/anti-universe pair that is created from nothing.”

Forbes reports the only real conclusion from this experiment is that the ‘Standard Model concerning neutrinos—fundamental particles—doesn’t explain the detection of a rare kind of event by ANITA.’

Credit: Alarn Light / Flickr

A scientist who specialises in Neutrinos and dark matter who works on IceCube Neutrino Observatory responded to the tabloid news reports of a parallel universe, clearing up that their words have been twisted in a list of tweets.

Safa writes: “NASA has discovered that y’all should not be getting your news from the new york post”.

He also states in a tweet that: “ANITA’s events are definitely interesting, but we’re a long ways away from even claiming there’s any new physics, let alone an entire universe.”

The release regarding the research paper mentions that ‘other explanations for the anomalous signals – possibly involved exotic physics – need to be considered.’

One of the leads from the paper, who has been investigating these detections for the last two years, took to Twitter to further clarify a few things. You can read the full thread here.

Credit: Long Ma / Unsplash

Essentially, Alex Pizzuto states that ANITA detected strange signals that are ‘hard (but not impossible) to remedy with our current models of physics’.

He also goes onto explain that although scientists have to come up with ways of modifying our understanding of physics, that may ‘require bizarre beyond the standard model ideas’, that there are also some ‘COMPLETELY non-exotic explanations as well’ such as astrophysics.

So while the experiments could be due to physics beyond our current understanding, a lead from the paper, Safa explained that: “it looks like we’ll have to wait for the next generation of experiments, which will increase exposure and sensitivity, to get a clear understanding of this anomaly.”

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Feature

Haunting images show harsh reality of life during World War II for the people of Manchester

A fascinating look at Manchester’s history…

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Mirrorpix

It would be hard to imagine a book that resonates more with today’s uncertain times than Clive Hardy’s latest nostalgia offering – The Home Front – Britain 1939-45.

The unshakeable spirit of a kingdom facing unparalleled challenge shines through Hardy’s highly readable commentary coupled with inspirational images from Britain’s local and national newspaper archives, including the M.E.N.

The result is a hardback that encapsulates the hope rising from the ashes of blitzed cities, the engaging innocence and cheerfulness of child evacuees and the gritty determination of hard-pressed servicemen and women.

We see Dad’s Army volunteers ready to tackle crack Nazi paratroopers with broom-handles and Zulu spears from a long forgotten conflict, women working all hours to make munitions, and Land Girls keeping the wheels of agriculture turning.

There is no shortage of photographs from Manchester and the North West either in what is the ninth publication from Withington company iNostalgia Ltd.

Devastation outside Ye Olde Wellington Inn during the Manchester Blitz, December 1940. CREDIT: Mirrorpix

Barrage balloons being prepared at Gaythorn Gasworks, Manchester, February 1939. CREDIT: Mirrorpix

The Christmas Blitz of December 1940 is covered in detail, along with the industrial output of Trafford that produced the hardware to fight the war.

Images include the manufacture of Rolls Royce Merlin engines for Spitfires, Hurricanes and Lancaster bombers at the Ford shadow factory in Eccles and barrage balloons being assembled at Gaythorn Gasworks.

There are scenes of jubilation as crowds celebrate VE Day in the centre of Manchester and street parties break out in the suburbs.

And there’s Belle Vue too. Manchester’s pleasure park never closed throughout the war as thousands sought to forget their woes for a few hours or more after entering the main gates on Hyde Road.

An aerial view of Belle Vue, which stayed open throughout the war, August 1957. CREDIT: Mirrorpix

Evacuees check their labels in a picture of childish innocence, September 1940. CREDIT: Mirrorpix

In The Home Front, Hardy takes us from the first stirrings of conflict right through to victory in Japan in August 1945. There is a wonderful mix of family memories and stories as well as the usual informed analysis from a seasoned researcher and writer.

Hardy actually started working on The Home Front well before Coronavirus first visited our shores. “I always wanted to gather together the extraordinary images from our newspapers during the war years”, he said. “Particularly our local newspapers.

“I’m full of admiration for the work of the Home Front photographers who portrayed the struggle and kept the nation informed – often at risk to their own lives”.

One photographer whose work is strongly profiled in the book is Daily Mirror cameraman George Greenwell, who took what are now regarded as iconic shots of St Paul’s Cathedral at the height of the London Blitz in December 1940.

“His images are breathtaking”, said Clive. “There’s one panorama from the dome of St Paul’s showing the statues of apostles silhouetted against the raging fires below. It was used right across pages 6 and 7 of the Daily Mirror on New Year’s Eve 1940”.

Rolls Royce Merlin engines at the Ford shadow factory in Eccles, February 1942. CREDIT: Mirrorpix

American troops stationed in the UK treat children to a cinema trip, December 1943. CREDIT: Mirrorpix

But it’s perhaps the images of everyday life that are the most stirring in Hardy’s book. Images like workers balancing precariously on the end of a tram track in the hope of prising a damaged rail from a bombed-out road to salvage it for the war effort.

Or the heart-warming picture of US troops stationed in England spending their own time and money taking children on a cinema trip in December 1943.

There are some fascinating chapters on entertainment and sport, not always covered in wartime memoires. Football was played, albeit on a limited basis, for most of the conflict. 

There are jubilant images of Preston North End winning the 1941 Football League War Cup by beating Arsenal 2-1 in a replay at Blackburn’s Ewood Park, and Charlton Athletic playing Reading at The Valley.

Boxing matches were staged on the deck of the Queen Mary moored in Liverpool in October 1941 and the annual Derby horse race transferred from Epsom to Newmarket. 

Greyhound racing was hugely popular as it was accessible to everyone. Home-raised dogs could compete with the best on tracks throughout the country.

Hardy includes all the wartime entertainment icons – Wigan’s own George Formby, Flanagan and Allen, Tommy Handley and Vera Lynn to name but a few – as well as providing insight into the BBC Home Service and less familiar shows that toured local theatres.

Wigan-born entertainer George Formby singing in Aldwych tube station, November 1940. CREDIT: Mirrorpix

Air raid warden Percy Dale in a staged picture with a blitz victim, October 1940. CREDIT: Mirrorpix

He also takes an intriguing look at wartime censorship as well as morale-boosting photos that were really not what they seemed – possibly the ‘fake news’ of their day!

In an interesting piece of detective work, Hardy shows how a George Greenwell image of air raid warden Percy Dale helping a Blitz victim in 1940 was in fact a staged shot superimposed on a photo of London’s Paternoster Row in flames.

It was like the famous picture of a London milkman making his way through the rubble to deliver milk, again in 1940. The milkman was actually the photographer’s assistant.

Whatever their genesis, the images did their job.

So too will this book. It could just be the ideal gift for this most unusual of Christmases.

‘The Home Front – Britain 1939-45’ is now on the sale with a special pre-order price of £14.99 – including UK postage and packing. You can get it online from iNostalgia here, or call the order hotline on 01928 503777.

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Feature

Incredible old Coronation Street photos give rare behind-the-scenes glimpse of the soap in the ’60s

A trip down memory lane…

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Mirrorpix

There were some extraordinary sights to behold when photographers gained access to the hallowed set of Coronation Street half a century ago.

Not least was prim and proper Annie Walker, landlady of the Rovers Return, lying down on a bed with husband Jack – in broad daylight too!

Campaigner Mary Whitehouse would have had a fit!

But it was all perfectly innocent. Actress Doris Speed was taking a break from filming to brush up on her script while fellow actor Arthur Leslie was catching up on forty winks.

It was just one of many insights into everyday life on the set at the nation’s favourite soap in April 1968.

Street stars were snapped in the canteen, in make-up, relaxing in the rehearsal room and even at home.

Doris Speed (Annie Walker) and Arthur Leslie (Jack Walker) relax between takes, May 1968. CREDIT: Mirrorpix

The front of the Rovers Return – part of an inside set, May 1968. CREDIT: Mirrorpix

We saw what the wooden sets looked like from behind the TV façade. Even the famous front of the Rovers was an inside prop without a cobblestone in sight.

The front doors and twitching curtains on the Street were shown to be little more than flimsy panels bolted on to scaffolding.

It was just about enough to look convincing on low resolution black and white TVs. But at least the curtains were real!

The outdoor set was only built in 1968 – eight years after Coronation Street was first aired in December 1960. Before then, everything was on the inside.

To mark the occasion, Granada organised a cast publicity shot celebrating the wedding of Dennis Tanner (Philip Lowrie) and Jenny Sutton (Mitzi Rogers).

Included in the line-up with the newlyweds were Annie Walker (Doris Speed), Ena Sharples (Violet Carson), Emily Nugent (Eileen Derbyshire), Valerie Barlow (Anne Reid), Ken Barlow (William Roache), Len Fairclough (Peter Adamson) and Elsie Tanner (Pat Phoenix).

Coronation Street’s new outdoor set – wood and scaffolding – in May 1968. CREDIT: Mirrorpix

The cast line up for Dennis and Jenny’s wedding, May 1968. CREDIT: Mirrorpix

All the TV shots were on a tight angle, so it was impossible to see the end of the scaffolding clearly visible behind the happy couple on the small screen.

Originally the houses on the interior set were built to three-quarters scale. Actors had to walk more slowly than usual to make the houses look normal.

Everything was shot inside because early production techniques made it difficult to record and edit sequences filmed in different locations.

The studios at Granada were not big enough for the entire street to be built in one section, so it had to be split into two halves.

The pavements and cobbled street were painted on to the studio floor!

In spite of the limitations and cramped conditions, some the Street’s most dramatic scenes were filmed there – including the collapse of Number 7 due to a faulty beam in 1965.

There was more tension two years later when Ena Sharples was buried under the rubble of a train crash. There was an agonising wait to see if the Street stalwart was alive or dead.

Fortunately she was dug out by Dennis Barlow and later discharged herself from hospital to stride back into the Rovers as bold as brass.

Margot Bryant (Minnie Caldwell) in the Granada canteen, April 1968. CREDIT: Mirrorpix

Interior shot of the corner shop and lounge, May 1968. CREDIT: Mirrorpix

The new outside set was built on railway sidings near the Granada studios. The TV storyline said it was due to the demolition of the Mission Hall and Elliston’s raincoat factory, and the building of maisonettes opposite the terrace.

The actors called the new set ‘the coldest place on earth’ because the wind was naturally funneled directly down the street. Filming outside was rare anyway as it was far more expensive than interior shots.

It was a lot more cosy inside in the corner shop counter and lounge, complete with a battery of stage lights and cameras.

It was cosier still in the canteen where Margot Bryant, who played the wonderful Minnie Caldwell, was pictured queuing up with her tray.

Taking her turn in make-up was Eileen Derbyshire who played Emily Nugent, the longest-standing female character in the serial.

Eileen Derbyshire (Emily Nugent) in make-up, April 1968. CREDIT: Mirrorpix

Pat Phoenix (Elsie Tanner) runs through her script, April 1968. CREDIT: Mirrorpix

Philip Lowrie (Dennis Barlow) and Mitzi Rogers (Jenny Sutton) rehearse their lines, May 1968. CREDIT: Mirrorpix

Emily first appeared on screen in January 1961 and only left in January 2016 after a stint of 55 years.

The 1968 set fared less well. It became the New York Street on the Granada Studios tour but resurfaced occasionally in Coronation Street.

The first time was in 2004 when it doubled as the Davenports car dealership where Sally Webster had an affair with her boss Ian Davenport.

It was also the strip club where Lloyd Mullaney met Cheryl Gray and the nightclub where Kylie Platt was working in 2012.

An almost full-size street exterior was finally built in the Granada backlot in 1982 – and was officially opened by the Queen.

If you enjoyed this head over to the iNostalgia website here for more interesting tales about Manchester’s history.

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Feature

Artist creates haunting post-apocalyptic images of Manchester

This is so spooky…

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James Chadderton Art

We’ve probably never been as close to an actual ‘apocalypse’ than this shoddy year…

James Chadderton is a British mixed-media artist who works consistently on creating apocalyptic landscapes.

They often show nightmare-inducing scenes of cityscapes that blend the line between reality and fiction.

James takes inspiration from dystopian films and video games, drawing the viewer into a crazy alternative reality. 

James Chadderton Art
James Chadderton Art

Using famous Manchester landmark he turns the urban landscapes into haunting post-apocalyptic scenes. 

Not only does it give us an insight into what the world might look like after an apocalypse, it gives you the chance to let your imagination run wild and wonder how and why. 

James’ portfolio includes work for Manchester legend Peter Hook, who he designed the cover of his EP 1101/2011 for. He’s also even worked with EA on the Battlefield franchise. 

His work has been displayed up and down the country but now you can have it in your very own home. 

James Chadderton Art
James Chadderton Art

He’s also done images of London, Liverpool and even the iconic Blackpool tower. 

You can see more images here and even buy one for your house! 

 

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